Election Reflection: IGNITE women are the MVPs

What we know thus far is that young people voted at rates we have never seen - from 14% of the electorate in Michigan to a whopping 21% of the electorate in Georgia.*

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Books you should be reading during Native American Heritage Month

November is Native American Heritage Month, which started as a week-long celebration in 1986 and evolved into a month-long celebration. Indigenous peoples have a long history, rich culture and stories to tell that often go unheard. We’ve put together a book list that shares some of those stories, traditions and experiences of North America’s native populations. 

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5 Ways to Hold Elected Officials Accountable

Election Day is over just like that. Now what? This election has consumed many of us for what feels like the better part of a year. It’s fair to be feeling tired, burnt out, and frankly ‘over’ political discussions. But in reality, we’re just getting started. Now is when we begin the next phase of our civic duty - we hold politicians accountable for their promises.

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Women of Color in the 116th Congress

As we commemorate the centennial of women’s suffrage in 2020, it is important to remember that not every woman could cast a ballot after the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920. Women of color couldn’t exercise their voting right for more than four decades until the Voting Rights Act was passed in 1965. Despite the fact that only 100 years ago, women couldn’t even vote in the United States, the current 116th Congress comprises the highest number of female members in its history so far. Out of 127 women in the Congress today, 48 of them identify as women of color—4 in the Senate and 44 in the House. One of the notable women of color in Congress is Senator Kamala Harris who, as of November 7, 2020, is the Vice President-elect of the United States. Although the representation of women of color in Congress is yet to reach its pinnacle, the 116th Congress is a beautiful reminder of how far we have come. Keep reading below about some of the remarkable women of color in the 116th Congress: 

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A timeline of Kamala Harris' career

Kamala Devi Harris is an American politician and attorney who has served as the junior United States senator from California since 2017. As of November 7, 2020, she is the Vice-President Elect. Here's a timeline of key moments that brings us to the first African American, the first Indian American, and the first woman to serve as Vice President of the United States.

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Recover from your post-elections blues

Phew! We made it through what might be the most taxing and emotionally draining election of our lifetime. People were stressed out before the election, and now having to wait to see who will be the winner, it seems like we can’t catch a break. If you’re feeling stressed or having some post-election blues, you certainly aren’t alone. 

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Post-election detox guide

We’ve been building up to election day for months on end. We’ve mobilized voters, educated our peers, and together, we’ve set voter turnout records. As an election year coupled with a pandemic and ongoing social unrest, 2020 has been unprecedented to say the least. With the election cycle over and the year coming to an end, it’s time to take a break. It’s time to detox. 

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Certifying Election Results

Elections are far from over at the close of polling on Election Day. After everyone’s cast their ballots, we still have a ways to go before election results are finalized and made official. In this post, we take a brief look at how and when presidential election results (from the general election) are certified.

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Your last-minute action plan to #IGNITEtheVote

Wake up on Wednesday morning knowing you did everything in your power to turnout the vote.

It's time to step on the gas. Let's make the most of these final days. 

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Take Action for Latina Equal Pay Day

Talking about the wage gap can be taboo. But, if women don’t stand up to ensure we’re equally paid, who will? An essential step in creating an equal and just society is guaranteeing everyone is valued equally. 

October 29, 2020 is Latina Women’s Equal Pay Day; the last equal pay day of the year. This means Latina women are paid the least across all other demographics. It takes approximately 23 months to make what their white male counterparts made in the previous year. The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) estimates that over a 40 year career the average Latina will lose $1,000,000 in income. Women of color are disproportionately affected by the wage gap, despite women of color contributing so much to the uniqueness of society. 

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